Rudy Mawer

Yes, I was. It’s funny because I was never born into money. Even though very successful. 20 years ago, triathlon was the sport that my mom won a gold medal and, and even now, like, I’m actually friends, and two of my clients are the current Olympic gold medalist triathlon. It’s not a sport like the NFL or the NBA. Where you, you know, you crazy money, right? It’s better now, but 20 years ago, nothing sponsorships, really. I mean, you won like 20 grand for went being the best in the world, which is like, insane. But no, what I so I learned, like financially, you know, wasn’t born into money, or they weren’t entrepreneurs. But I guess what I, I didn’t, I wouldn’t say I specifically learned something like, you know, that I can pinpoint. But if I look back from what I saw of my parents, my mom trained for three different sports every day and worked and looked after me. And she was up at six she would swim and bike go to work pick me up from school later. And then she’d go and train two more times and come home at 9:10pm II and repeat the cycle. Right? And that’s kind of like how is our dedication? Yeah. So so that you know that I got to travel the world or the braces, because triathlons are all over the world. You know, Mexico, Canada, all around the world, Hawaii, I went a bunch of times. So I got to spend a lot of time with elite athletes. And you know, like, while I can’t pinpoint, like, specific strategies that I necessarily learn, it’s just more like, I think being surrounded in that environment. Growing up as a kid, right. That’s probably what impacted me. And I mean, if I had to pinpoint it to one thing, I don’t remember this, but my mom always told me this since I became successful, she said, As a kid, I always told you, you could do anything you ever wanted. So I mean, it’s probably not. Right.

Jeremy Weisz

I mean, really, like your subconscious is being trained. Yeah, as you’re observing this. Yeah. Working hard, you know, just going after what you want, I imagine.

Rudy Mawer

Yeah. Um, was very, my mom ironically, she was very old. She was in her 40s when she won, most Olympic you know, most top athletes are in their 30s or even nowadays, the 20s. So, triathlon is an older sport, but again, you know, it’s like defying the odds and achieve you know, if you set your mind to it, and work hard and smart, you can do it right.

Jeremy Weisz

When you were young Rudy, what did you want to be?

Rudy Mawer

Ah, so I was never like, I mean, you know, I always hear stories of kids saying, as a when they were young, they wanted to be like an astronaut, or a doctor or something. And my mom’s parents have never told me that ever said anything like that. I did say that I wanted to move to America. While I was obsessed with basketball, and I came over to America a few times on vacation, and I just loved it just seemed more vibrant, vibrant, more energized, bigger, bigger and better in life. Life seemed bigger out in America. And I was you know, everyone says, oh, London’s cool. Why would you want to leave England? like London is like Manhattan. I didn’t live in London. I lived in like Missouri equivalent. You got to remember, like, it was from a from like, a decent sized city in England. But it’s just a different mindset. Right. And it’s Yeah, much different whole mentality. So yeah, back to your original question. I don’t know if there was a specific thing I said, but I was always obsessed with money, too. I was the kid that got banned from selling in school. I made my mom go to like, the Sam’s Club equivalent. And I actually had to like, get the big Call for my friend who owned a mechanic shop just to get us into Sam’s Club to then buy candy that I could then go. I mean, my dad set up a PayPal and eBay account when I was like seven. When in the UK no one even knew what that was right? Because technology’s behind. We you know, we barely had a computer most houses didn’t even have a computer when I was a kid. And I was buying and selling on eBay. So I think it was just more the entrepreneur and me and the some for some reason they obsession with money.

Jeremy Weisz

Was it a big deal for you? When you start training and you’d love to NBA you want to move to America training some NBA players?

Rudy Mawer

Yeah, well, that was cool. It was like it was more it was more with them. It was more consulting, like virtually on nutrition supplementation. so quiet like is like, you know, in with them every day training them physically because they will have like a full team around them. So I wasn’t in that I was brought in as a consultant to look over their nutrition and supplementation regime. It’s still cool. It was cool. But the funny part was I actually drifted away from basketball back then. So when I was doing it, I wasn’t a big basketball fan. And I actually recently when COVID here and I stopped traveling, I picked it up again. And now I play every day. And I’m obsessed with it again. But I want Yeah, so But yeah, definitely cool to work with these people. But just like anything in life you like once you start doing it a lot, sadly, it becomes kind of normal, right? So it’s like, Yeah, I remember the days when like, half of my friends now in the entrepreneur space. I was learning from them six years ago, listening to their podcasts and like, now I’m speaking on stage at their events and hanging out with them. And then my business partners and friends. So and it’s like, you have to pinch yourself a few times and remember where you’ve come from. But I think most of us as entrepreneurs, we’re always looking forward, not backwards. Right. So you don’t always appreciate that.

Jeremy Weisz

Talk about that, Rudy for a second. Some of the people that you learn from early on that now are your colleagues and you are speaking in their stages and doing business with them.

Rudy Mawer

Yes, I mean, like one of them is Digital Marketer, right? Like I they will have the first courses and like podcasts I learned and now I’m friends with Ryan Deiss. And all the the owners of it I you know, I’m I speak I spoke at TNC their biggest event and I went to that event four years ago, five years ago, when I didn’t really know what any of this was. I always remember Ryan Moran if you know Ryan Moran of capitalism.com I think his was the first event I ever went to set up didn’t know who Ryan was. Someone just said I should go there. And I was sat at the back of the room had no clue. I mean, it says first capitalism or second event, like five, six years ago, didn’t know a whole ton about marketing back then. I know a decent amount many Facebook ads. And then I think like two years ago, he became a client of mine. And then I was speaking on his stage. And then now he’s a friend, right? And Tai Lopez the obvious one, like I remember seeing his videos on YouTube five, six years ago, and he hasn’t

Jeremy Weisz

seen his videos.

Rudy Mawer

Yeah. And then you know, now Now we speak every day and we’re business partners. So it’s just the evolution of of life, you know, if you will.

Jeremy Weisz

Yeah, I mean, I, we hung out and I you know, you spoke at Stefan Georgi and Justin Goff event which you gave an amazing presentation. They have some killer stuff in the direct response world. How did you meet Tai Lopez.

Rudy Mawer

So obviously started to kind of get to know him in the space. We spoke at events, similar events together. But there was kind of two ways eventually we got we got connected because he was looking to restart an agency. And I had a big agency that was pretty well known in the internet marketing world. So several people mentioned my name. And then what actually to two people made the like, actually kind of got everything move in was one of my friends Paul Getter he has a big marketing firm called The Nerds, he was helping Tai as a consultant and friend connected us and then actually my head copywriter and creative director was doing some consulting and copy for Tai too. So we just started you know, meeting talking me and type your relationship and then eventually we started an agency together. And that started to take off for a few months but it was about two years ago, just before we got like started getting dressed bond and these other brands. So we kind of pivoted pretty quickly in a sense of, you know, our time and attention is now on these brands. And that’s where I kind of work 14 hours a day is supporting, you know, Tai on the front line. It’s like a we’ve got a nice setup Tai on the front line, find the deals. Alex is in the middle between Tai and the brands and me and then I’m like I operate in all the brands with Alex and Tai and overseeing them.

Jeremy Weisz

So let’s talk about, you know, relaunch. Now your, you know, kind of, in a heading up Pier1. So what does that look like for you?

Rudy Mawer

I mean, it’s a big company, right? That one is actually our biggest because we took it over. We took it over at like, Inception when it was just coming down, went into bankruptcy, but we relaunch right away. So you know, a lot of these other brands, they dress bond with similar but Linens ‘n Things, as you know, was gone was out of, you know, out of sales for a long time. So, Pier1 is a much bigger, one faster to regrow it more going on, probably a stronger brand name, because people you know, it was was really active, right, just last year, I think, to get to a 19, as you see on the screen, over 1,000,000,001 and a half billion in revenue. So, yeah, it’s great. I mean, it’s all the challenges that you would expect to run in a brand that is probably bigger than what most of us are used to in the internet marketing world or in a brand, you know, brand. Like Pier1, it’s kind of you have different issues, and the issues are much bigger, like I, I don’t do a whole bunch in my agency now have a really great team now about 5060 staff. It’s really, you know, I built it to be run really well, without me, which came at a good time, luckily, because of all of this. And I’m still involved in work that daily, but I was saying to the head of Ops, and the director of marketing, I was like, you know, all of our small problems here. And nothing, when I go and look at what I’m dealing with, with all these brands, and not in a bad way, like these brands are in trouble that they’re actually doing great since we took over them. And we’re making such tremendous strides forward with them. But it’s just, it’s just like anything is amplified, right? The bigger the brand, the bigger the problem, the bigger the revenue, the bigger the problems, the more money you make more problems you get. But you’re also better at dealing with them.

Jeremy Weisz

What are some of the challenges? What are some examples of challenges,

Rudy Mawer

just hyper growth, right hyper growth and build in, you know, building the brand around hyper growth, I would say, of the challenges are, you’re taking over brand at bankruptcy, it has its own set of challenges with like customer experience, because customers don’t really understand that. So that’s something you have to work hard on in the first year. And make it clear that you know, and even just so many like vendors and stuff right there, which I get like if they were selling as furniture before company was building as furniture company goes bankrupt, sometimes the company goes bankrupt and the invoices are left, right. And then the even the vendors are hurt. And that’s not our liability, because we do the noose, new LLC, basically. But you have to re establish those relationships.

Jeremy Weisz

Yeah, talk about that for a second. Because I imagine trust is lost in the brand, even though you take over and they’re like, I don’t wanna I don’t know, if I want to do business with a company that stiffed me on lots of invoices. So how do you rebuild that? What do you do?

Rudy Mawer

It’s not hard, right? We face these barriers, face these issues, and then we figure out an easy solution like we have, you just have to jump up with, you know, explain it right, basically, versus just pinging them an email, you have to actually explain what’s happened, right, and you have to explain, like, we, we bought this company, there’s nothing to do with as none of the legacy founders or owners or directors are involved over here. We own retail e commerce ventures we have, you can see all the brands behind us. We’re also ran from, you know, a team of marketing experts that have built ecommerce brands for 20, 30 years, 40 years combined, since the internet basically started. And yeah, we just kind of explain that. Explain that and just, you know, show that we have multiple brands behind us and that, you know, and we and then we start small, right? Sometimes I’m you know, in terms of like net terms and stuff we might change, and like make sure we pay them quicker and pay them in smaller chunks. So you can build trust that way. And just yeah, you know, you get obviously a couple of like, no, but it’s been it’s been fine. I mean, it’s a challenge. It was a challenge, but it’s been fine. We’ve worked through it.

Jeremy Weisz

Yeah, yeah, no, that’s good. I mean, it’s like you just got to build trust slowly. Right. Okay. And starts with just those gestures of, Okay, we’re paying you on time and quick. Talk about So, you know, you’re an e commerce guy. You are a direct response guy. You are a media guy. So you take over Pier1, and you know, I know you love sales, right. So how do you look at what products should we keep or product should we We not keep and then actually driving, you know, sales. What’s the strategy as far as growth goes?

Rudy Mawer

Yeah. So I mean, I’m a big numbers guy, right? So I was a, as a side sport scientist, you’re also a data scientist, whatever, what you know, whatever science field you’re in, if I worked in a lab as a researcher, so you have to become really good at data and spreadsheets. And I was also very good at math. So it’s easy for me. So I’m a data guy. So I just come in all these brands, I look at the data, what’s the top sellers want the best net margins. And as I write there, it’s like common sense. And the hardest part of any brand. And I think the thing that separates me from most marketers and entrepreneurs is the my appreciation for the data and how I bury it into my team to a point where if they’re not on board, they get fired. So in my businesses, I have data dashboards that show me every single number you could ever imagine, for every single thing, I have a need that’s updated hourly, that I can get with a click of a button. And what I’ve, what I found the reason I can build brands, and actually, they function without me, and I will share in this another clip, I actually share this at my talk at traffic and conversion was when the data is so clean, and presented to everyone in the business. It’s also is almost so is idiot proof, because I literally like I even asked my team, I’m like, you know, like, here’s the Daily Report, what should we do. And if something’s made 20 grand, and something’s lost five grand, and one webinar lead is worth $1,000, a phone call and one funnel is only getting you $200 per phone call and average revenue generated? What should we scale? And anyone can say, Oh, you probably should do more of the wall. Yeah, that’s how I try and build these businesses. So even Pier1 I come in first two weeks, I just became obsessed with all the numbers, all the data, all the financials. And I have like the team just building all these crazy reports. And they probably think I’m insane. But like, now it works. Because now everyone’s like, Oh, we should send an email with more of these products with the highest net margins that are also the highest net sellers. And oh, we did 100 grand here. But by time we pay shipping cost of goods, we hardly made any profit. So we’ve probably should do less of this and like more of this. So that’s what I try and do because then it’s just easy business becomes easy. When you do that. At least the markets in and a scale inside of business. There’s a lot more that goes into business around operations, teams, legal, fulfillment, blah, blah, blah, right. But that side of it, I mean, the data is a big part of it.

Jeremy Weisz

I love the 80, 20 approach, you know, you look at what’s the whatever it could be 95. Five, what’s the top 5% that’s gonna lead to 95% growth. And you look at the top sellers, you look at net margins, what are some of the other key metrics or data that you’re looking at?

Rudy Mawer

I mean, yeah, I mean, if you go granular in the data, EPC and net EPC, most people ignore that one, and that one is actually the most important. So that’s earnings per click. And then also, if you have fulfilment, it’s net earnings per click, and I actually had the team run this report for one of the brands, I don’t want to give too many details over confidentiality. But you know, and it was actually very eye opening for the team, because they like they gave me a report. And it wasn’t quite clear on what categories were the best sellers, what was the best one to scale. And it had great metrics that every marketer would look for it had conversion rate had revenue of AOV had. Yes, I have conversion rate AOV. So to the key metrics, right, but it still wasn’t really clear, like Which one should we really scale. So they’re now going out in EPC, and then net EPC, after chords, and it was like, we will start on a screenshare for four minutes and did it and it was like, wildly obvious, like the EPC was kind of a little obvious, but then you have cogs and then when we didn’t that EPC were cogs there was like one category was free, 100% higher in net revenue and all the rest. And it’s just you know, that I got to dig

Jeremy Weisz

deep into that. So like for people listening, you know, the conversion rate, the average, the average order volume, right, if someone’s buying, you know, whatever 100 as opposed to $50 and then you’re digging into the earnings per click, and then the net earnings per click,

Rudy Mawer

but get this so, so again, I can’t give away too many details, but the highest, the highest AOV was actually one of the worst now EPC and the $30. The lowest EP, the lowest AOV was the highest net EPC

Jeremy Weisz

Have you just go off of aov? You’re like, oh, let’s scale the AOV, but it wasn’t profit is

Rudy Mawer

profit 99% of people would have made that mistake. And they literally would run an entire business for six months, based off 114 minute mistake.

Jeremy Weisz

Oh, that’s huge, right? I mean, it looks good, right? Because it produces a lot of, you know, gross revenue, but it’s not profitable.

Rudy Mawer

Yeah. And now like, Look, if you’re selling info products and courses, it’s a little simpler, and you probably safer with AOV, but for us in a physical company, especially when it’s like some of our companies or clothing, electronics furniture, you have more logistical stuff, you have fulfillment costs of that you have large packet, extra charges. And that’s the stuff I have to now account for that. I didn’t when I was selling $19 Fitness ebooks, I had returned, refund rate 2% and 3% credit card fees, and then I have Facebook ad fees, and that was it. Right?

Jeremy Weisz

So really talk to me. Maybe like an overarching strategy. So so the you know, the the company’s like, okay, Rudy, we just bought RadioShack. Let’s run with it.

Rudy Mawer

And that’s all you do. Yeah, Alex will call me on a Sunday, it will be because you know, the long process leading up to it Tai and Alex do more of the buying and the acquisition side, like I’m more on the operation marketing side, which is great, because that Alex has sold to and you know, he sold Zeus for a quarter of a billion dollars. So he’s gone, you know, he’s been there, done that. And Tai super experienced in that side, I’m not. And I’ll get there. Like, that’s probably the next phase is me helping with that one day. But we also have to make sure all the brands we’re buying are operated. So, you know, I place I have a very valuable role on this side of it. So but it will be back to your question. It will be, you know, I they’ll obviously tell me early on the plan, like I already know, a major brand now on the biggest in the world that we’re working on that I can’t share. It’s confidential, but it will you know, and they’ll keep me updated. Like, it’s going through this phase, blah, blah, blah, it’s with attorneys, it might go to auction. And then it will be like, now I know, I know, we’re close. And then it will be, you know, like, we have calls every day. So you never know. But it’s like, I’ll answer it. And like it’ll be it’ll be like so, or something, you know, one key word, and then it’d be like we won RadioShack. So get ready, you’re gonna get the keys in two days. Turn it on. Yeah. So but yeah, it’s it sounds the question, it starts like that. And then it’s. Yeah, I mean, it’s a lot. And a few is a lot in the first few weeks, because you’re taking over. I mean, if you bought any brand, it’s a lot, right? You’re trying to take over logins, figure out the brand, the analytics, all this stuff. And when it’s a brand that’s like been a big public brand, it’s just even more, right. There’s more legal stuff, like RadioShack has like 70, international trademarks around the world, and licenses and patents and stuff. Like it’s stuff like that, that, you know, I’ve never experienced before figuring working with attorneys there, some of them, you have to work with another set of attorneys on who can you now email and text versus who has to re opt in for compliance. And then it’s just all kinds of wild stuff like that, right? And it’s just like this two examples of stuff that we might not have to deal with every day as normal marketers will become like our own brands, right? Yeah. And but it and it’s like anything in life you like, I think a good analogy is, you know, when you walk into like, a bedroom, and it’s so messy, it’s like, where do I start? But if you just start by the end of the day, it’s clean, and you just like have to, sometimes you just got to start somewhere and it like, it just falls into place, as long as you’re strategic and organized. Yeah, yeah,

Jeremy Weisz

I’m wondering, like, 30,000 square foot view, you’re starting, once you kind of see, you know, the clouds part a little bit, you’re cleaning stuff up. I’m wondering your methodology. So you may go cool, like, I’m gonna build, I’m gonna look at these specific numbers. I’m gonna build a dashboard. Like what are the things you’re doing an X before you get to the fun stuff? Like the marketing stuff, right? You have to do all that other not maybe. So?

Rudy Mawer

Yeah, I mean, you got to get products on there, right? Because sometimes we take over stock, sometimes we take over no inventory. So we got to reestablish that that’s a big part of it re establishing with vendors and getting products and stock on there. We have to rebuild the e commerce site. And we use my agency a lot to do a lot of that and we have internal teams, but with my agency and the internal team we have for all the brands we know it’s more turnkey, right because we’ve done it well, eight times. Now, however, many times I lose track of how many brands we’ve got. And obviously, my agency’s done 1000s of sites, but specifically for these e commerce brands, it’s more turnkey at this point. So we, you know, we built rebuild the site or take over the current site, we get all the ad accounts set up. We look at the team, because sometimes we take over a lot of, we don’t have to, but sometimes we’ll hire a lot of the old employees. Sometimes we’ll hire new employees. And we’ll lean on our current team as well to get stuff started. Yeah, we’ll look through the data, the analytics. And don’t get me wrong, like not day one, I’m probably not building these dashboards. I’m like trying to get stuff rolling and just get some traffic, they’re looking at the email list, looking at the best emails, they’ve seen how the automations are built out. And yeah, just kind of piecing all that together, trying to get some, once you’ve got products on there getting some ads on and then it’s just like, stepping stones after that, right. So like, what’s next? What’s next? And, you know, before you know, it, 30 6090 days in, you’re in control of everything, it’s going well, and you’re scaling it up?

Jeremy Weisz

Do you have an email platform, I imagine you probably inherit a lot of these different software 30 sending emails to this system, and this system, what what email systems do you prefer? And you bring them on? Like, as far as that goes?

Rudy Mawer

We you because it’s Shopify, we use klaviyo? Because it just integrates so well, with Shopify, right?

Jeremy Weisz

What have you is anything surprised you as you’ve gone in, you’re looking under the hood of some of these brands of some of the emails or design or, or things that have converted? Because you’ve probably seen so many campaigns at this point.

Rudy Mawer

Yeah, I mean, it surprised me and I, I live by an ethics code, which I share with the team because there was a lot of time of like, Oh, this is not what Pier1 used to do. And I have this one rule. I’m like, never follow a billion dollar bat brand that went bankrupt. If they did that, let’s do the opposite at this end of the spectrum. So I often have to remind people of that. So I’d send you know, and I’m not saying all these brands are bad, they did a lot of great stuff. But just in general, it’s like you have to forget the old way and like do the new way. Right. So there’s some great stuff, you know, there’s some great stuff in there. And there’s some stuff that could be just amazed that right? Some of the brands take weeks to send out emails and get organized. Whereas internet marketers, we want to send out an email, we send our tech guy a slack message, send this and five minutes later, it’s been sent out, right. So I think that’s a big part of it that we bring is that speed and that pivoting and that testing ethos that a lot of us entrepreneurs have that big brands don’t have because they have so many hoops to jump through, right? If you want an email sent in corporate, it has to go like plan two weeks earlier, there’s got to go for like eight people to get approved. But yeah, in terms of what does well, the biggest thing that I found not just even in these brands, but in all the brands that I run, like my own personal brands, and my clients under the agency is like it always comes back to the hook and the offer, the more and more and more I’ve done of this. It’s the hook in the offer like three, four years ago. I was like it’s the ads. It’s the copy. Now I’m like it’s the hook in the offer. And I know this to be true because

Jeremy Weisz

well, Justin Stefan, just love that you said that.

Rudy Mawer

Yeah. But you come home and they might not love this part as much. But I mean, you can even have pretty bad copy. if the hook and the offer is insane. And it sells itself. And I know that’s true. In the e commerce side, because these brands, you know, you look at the emails and the ads and none of them. Look at any big brand in America, the one that the Facebook ads you see that have 1000s of likes and shares, none of them have this long copy, that pulls on emotion and then urgency and taps all that you know ticks all the boxes on what’s great copy, it’s just either a really cool, great product at a great price probably with some sort of flash sale, or it’s not right. So that’s kind of and you can take the hook and the offer you know in the marketing world with funnels, the copy is sure it’s more important. But even in my own business, we test a lot of hooks you know and offers and is 90% it’s the hook and the offer like I can throw up a page with two hours of copy and a two minute video less copy an hour of copy or no copy a headline a sub headline a video and if the hook and offer is strong, it’ll scale if it’s weak, it won’t and I can have my best copywriter spend a week writing a sales page. If the hook and the offer is not perfect, then that sales page will still flop right. So

Jeremy Weisz

I think they would agree with that. I mean the hook is part of the copy and everything but so what would be an example Rudy, of a hook and offer that you just saw convert, you know do really well.

Rudy Mawer

Well so good example is my free top selling courses that have all done millions of dollars alone in my own brands is my first fitness one that made me my first millions with a 90 day bikini plan. Okay. It still sells this day hundreds of 1000s of copies sold. And the ironic part is I wrote that sales page. I remember I wrote the sales page on an iPad. I had one Indian developer at $5 an hour on up work code the page, I was on an iPad, at the pool in Orlando, and my dad and his family came to visit from the UK. And the copy was not great is still not great. But I’ve had world class copywriters, including myself, try and rewrite it with a new hook and lead in and flow and more long form. No one’s ever beat it. It’s like, because it’s the hook and the offer. Okay, and it’s not even that cool is 90 day bikini plan. It’s not like this, you know, Game Changing hook and offer. But that that was an example, in

Jeremy Weisz

what was the offer there. So the the hook is like,

Rudy Mawer

yeah, it’s just $19. And you get everything, all your meal plan, you get meal plans, training plans, Supplement Plans. And you know, it’s a 90 day bikini plan. And you know, a bit of the hook is I’m a leading sports scientist, and I’m teaching you about hormones and more advanced mechanisms that no one else does. And that’s why you’re going to get results. But is a prime example of that hook and offer, it’s just just lead the way and it’s never been beaten. And I’ve launched, I probably split tested 40 of a fitness funnels in the last few years, like over the years and nothing can beat it.

Jeremy Weisz

You know, Rudy, I know we have a few more minutes here. I would love to hear, you know, this is you just it’s kind of a throwaway comment. Yeah, like I spent a few hours a month that I built this 60 person agency. You know, that’s, you know, a huge deal. And I want to talk about just a few things that were key for you to systemize in an agency because most people can’t step out of that. That role. So

Rudy Mawer

well. And don’t get me wrong. I spent 16 hours a day of tremendous stress. Yes. three years to get it to this. No, I

Jeremy Weisz

got it. Totally.

Rudy Mawer

Yeah. But I guess to answer the question, look, I it comes back to the chess stuff, right that I’m seeing the big picture. I’m systematic. I’m strategic. And I tried to build at least now not years ago, but I tried to build all my businesses to do that. So I want to empower my staff hire is is all about the people, right? You hear that saying a lot. But I make sure I have a great team. I make sure I have good staff, I make sure have really good systems. And most importantly, I build my systems. If you go back to the homepage, all my staff are at the bottom too. But I make sure

Jeremy Weisz

yeah, there was one one page I was trying to get to where they’re all wearing ROI machines shirts,

Rudy Mawer

I think at the bottom, at the bottom. Okay, cool. But whatever I was saying is I build the systems and the training for my team in based on my brain. So it’s like I almost build my brain into I know what you’re talking about. If you go to about an FAQ. Yeah, I’ll header. I mean, it’s the the careers page probably.

Jeremy Weisz

Yeah, no, this is what I was looking for. Yeah, they all have I’m an ROI Machine.

Rudy Mawer

Yeah. So we do. We do quarterly retreats, I fly everyone from around the world into Orlando, I get two or three big mansions. And we have a week together. I mean, we haven’t since COVID. But yeah, but it’s like I build my brain and my strategy into the into the team and into my own systems. Okay. So then it’s still me running the business because it’s my brain. But it’s like I’ve taught them and built a system where they can run run the day to day all of that brain for me, right? So I’m not like, following up. Is this task done? Is this an hour? Did we do this? Did we do this? Right? So yeah, you’ve got to build great teams, great systems, hire great people, and then just figure out where your unique area of genius is. And then spend your time there. And then eventually, if you want to fully step out, you’ve got to find hire someone really good on a really high salary, that super experience to fill that last gap that only you could fill. And I think a lot of entrepreneurs get can get close to that part, but they can most con ever do that part because it’s so hard to do that.

Jeremy Weisz

What helps you do that?

Rudy Mawer

I think a lot of us have an internal, like fear slash mindset barrier that we can find that person. And I think for me, like I’ve always said like, I love mocks and I love the agency, but it’s not my life. Like it’s not going to be my legacy my life. It’s going to be a business I have I built for a few years that I want to keep running but I’m not I don’t want to be doing this. In 510 years, and I got to the point where it was pretty built out, it was doing well. We had a great team, I hired a kind of director of performance. His name’s Sean, he has, like, he worked with a gore for eight years has a bunch of copy and experience background, their marketing strategy. And, you know, I was kind of at a point where I was like, I mean, you just gotta like, cold turkey. So I was like, I’m like, and all this stuff was happening with the new brand. So it was like a good time because it was forced to hold the little. So I was like, you know, and even a couple of my staff, you know, I remember one of my staff was, like, really scared. She’s like, Rudy? I don’t think we should do this. It will crumble scary. Yeah. Yeah. And I was like, I’m like, what’s the worst that can happen? Let’s do it. And you like the staff and the team and the systems are good enough to notice. If the issue start to arise. It’s not like you’re gonna walk out? Well, firstly, I never walked out, I still check in and I still help. And I still provide the strategy for clients, which is the 8020, but it’s something I can do in five minutes or in the first call, and then it’s set. Right and the team can action it. And yeah, is like I’m very proud as well. The agency runs just as well without me as it did with me.

Jeremy Weisz

Rudy, thank you so much. I want to be the first one to thank you. Everyone should check out your website’s ROImachines.com you could check out what they’re working on at Retail E-commerce, RetailEcommerceVentures.com. And thanks so much, Rudy. You’re awesome.

Rudy Mawer

Yeah. All right. Thank you.