Jeremy Weisz

Yeah. And I encourage people to check it out. Because you tell a story of your friend who this like totally impacted their life. And so check out her TEDx talk about it. And we will talk about going you fielding tons of pitches to now making it a better there’s a better way in public relations to get on channels and get on different sources, and we’ll talk about that. But I’d love to hear an example. Christina, you mentioned, because it did strike me when I when when you said okay, people watch negative? And if when you’re publishing positive stuff that didn’t get the views. So what is that going to fuel for the media to keep putting out negative things? I’m wondering what was something that was a positive news story that you remember, and maybe you were one of the anchors on it? Maybe it was just something you you saw at the station that you thought was going to do amazing. And it just flopped? Because it was positive? Do you remember any of those stories that like, Oh, this is a feel good story, everyone’s gonna love it. Everyone’s gonna view it, and then it just no one engage with it. And so

Christina Nicholson

yeah, I remember pitching a lot of stories that were more positive. They call them like fluff stories. And I remember pitching a lot of them. And basically, we just weren’t allowed to do them because there were other things happening. And they were more more hard news than soft news. So we just didn’t get a lot of opportunity to do it. The only time we really would was when you know, the last TV market I worked at was the NBC station in the Miami Fort Lauderdale area. That’s when LeBron James and Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh were playing for the heat. So we did some stories, you know, like I remember they would go to a hospital and they would hand out toys, you know, to kids at the hospital around Christmas. Things like that. Dwayne Wade, I remember I did a story with him helping to rehabilitate a house for a family in need. Those stories did okay. But if they didn’t have the big celebrity basketball players behind them, we probably would not have done them. They just added. They just added that level of newsworthiness because of the people involved. And it’s unfortunate, but at the end of the day, every news agency is a business, they have to get ratings. And if it is shown that that us doing positive news stories don’t bring in ratings, we’re gonna stop doing positive news stories. And it kind of frustrates me when everybody says, oh, the news is so negative, I wish they did more positive stories. Well, we try and when we do, you don’t watch them. And when we do the negative ones, you watch those. So like, we if we did all positive stories all the time, we wouldn’t be in business because we wanted to have advertisers to pay for the production of everything because you’re not watching. So again, with the positive news stories, I have a client called Midas project spark and it’s a it’s a part of Midas, the the tire and the car company, and they give away cars to people in need. And they actually we started getting a little bit more traction for them during the pandemic, because people were looking for those feel good stories. And you know, there were stories of people losing jobs or losing their cars, they would be gifted a car. So that is an example of I think, when it worked and that was just again, a reflection of the new cycle, what was happening in the world what was happening in the country. So again, I’m sure we’ll discuss it throughout our chat today. But it all goes back to my Making it newsworthy. You know, like I mentioned with those basketball players, they made it newsworthy. With giving away cars, the pandemic made it a little bit more newsworthy because people were looking for those more positive stories and show of support.

Jeremy Weisz

Let’s talk about that. So there’s a bracelet company, tell me about them and about making them newsworthy.

Christina Nicholson

Yeah, So Little Words Project, these, this is what their product looks like, their one word bracelets, like you can think of any any word, it can be custom, or it can be something, you know, that’s generic, like breathe, believe, be happy. And we actually started working with this company before the pandemic, we’re still working with them now. And the owner created this idea when she was in college in her dorm room. And she’s built it up to a team of all women out of New Jersey, they call themselves the nice girl gang. And she just wanted to build her business. She wanted more awareness, like tell more people about about these bracelets and focus on women and, and I want to tell my story of a founder. So the biggest mistake people make when they pitch the media, and I saw this all the time as a TV reporter, is people will send out a press release, which that worked great in the 70s. But let me tell you today does not work as well. People still do it, because they’re just stocking in the times of when they learned this, but that is not how it works anymore. And they’ll just say, this is my company. And this is what we do. And this is what you should tell everybody about it. And it’s like, that’s not news. That’s like a free commercial. And it’s not exciting. It has nothing to do with news. So what we do to get a client like Little Words Project coverage is we look at the product itself, and we get it in a lot of roundups, so best gifts for Mother’s Day, Valentine’s Day is coming up best gifts for the woman in your life for Valentine’s Day. And then you look at those even more niche awareness days, you know, like national best friends day national Secretary’s

Jeremy Weisz

day or something Exactly.

Christina Nicholson

Because somebody is always doing a story about those days, people are looking for content, especially online. I mean, a lot of these these news agencies, these media outlets, these blogs, they can’t pump the content out fast enough. So the secret to getting products coverage is to look for those roundups and make it relevant. And then we also get her coverage. She is a Hispanic female business owner. So right away, we’re targeting people who write about Hispanics we’re talking about we’re targeting people who write about women, we’re targeting people who write about business owners. And she tells her story, we got her in Forbes, talking about how she was bullied when she was in high school and she was in college. So she created these bracelets. So she could look down and see a positive message. And it has a little registration code. So you can give it to somebody and you can kind of track who’s had it and how it’s helped them. So she talks about just her entrepreneurial story. And regardless of what you do, whether you have a product, whether you have a service, in addition to earning coverage to promote that, you also need to earn coverage to promote yourself, you always need to be building your personal brand, because that’s who people want to do business with. So we look at those two things like what is the main offering? And then what is their story? How can we promote them. And sometimes people come to us because they just want to build their personal brand. Because they know that by doing that, they will get more speaking gigs or more book sales or you know, whatever their end goal is,

Jeremy Weisz

yeah, it sounds like Christina, one of your superpowers of you and the company is drawing out those stories, because, you know, the product is one thing, but when you, you know, find out this person was bullied and their background and they have certain stories, and then maybe I imagine things that they don’t even consider a story or even consider that interesting, because it’s just maybe what they lived. And when you draw that out, I could see so many angles on that, because there’s so many things that come out on bullying. What’s another client that you have when you’re talking to them that you just discovered this amazing story? That it’s not even something that they they lead with or thought was amazing until you kind of drew it out of them?

Christina Nicholson

Yeah, well, I mean, I think it helps also that I’ve been on the other side, I worked as a TV reporter and anchor for 10 years. So I was getting all of those emails and all those press releases and deleting 99% of them. So I knew what a good pitch was. I knew what people in a newsroom were looking for when I started my business. And another example I could give you this was when I first started I didn’t have an agency I called myself a professional freelancer. I was looking for work on LinkedIn and Upwork. And that’s how I got started. I did that for almost two years. And I had a couple of guys come to me. They started a fitness app. So like Jeremy, if you’re in Texas, and I’m in Florida, and we want to to race each other something we could do this like virtually on an app like we were, like running side by side. And one of the guys had a crazy fitness story. He was 400 pounds and lost half his body weight through exercising. And then the other founder was a personal trainer. And they said, you know, we hired this PR agency, and nothing’s happening. And we’re just looking for some help. And I said, Well, let me see what this person’s doing. Like, let me just see why it’s not working. And this person was creating press releases just saying, This is the new app. And this is what it does. And this is what you should tell people about it, blah, blah, blah. And I’m like, Okay, how many apps are out there? How many fitness apps are out there, a new app is not news. So in three months, we ended up getting these two guys coverage. They were from Washington, DC. So we got them on TV, and Washington DC, which is a top 10 TV market. We got them in the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, the Today Show, we got them in Women’s Running in Men’s Fitness, a variety of places in just three months. And that was because we focused on one, the founders expertise as a personal trainer. So whenever anybody had any questions as it related to working out exercising cardio, we got him quoted, and when he was quoted, it was his name. And it was the co founder of this business. So yes, we’re not talking about the business and the whole article. And that’s, again, the mistake people make they think that’s what they’re going to get they that because that’s what they want. But nobody’s going to give you that you have to be happy with just being quoted, and getting that title and getting that backlink to your website, because that’s how it’s going to happen. And little by little, it all builds up. So we got him covered, just sharing his expertise, building his personal brand. And by the way, he also co founded this company, go check it out. And then the other guy, we got him coverage for his story, he lost half his body weight through running. So he created this running app to help other people. And when you lead with his story, and what he did to help other people. That’s how that running app earned coverage. We didn’t lead with the app because a new app is not news. And the problem a lot of people have is they’re so connected and invested in their service or their product, that they think it’s news because they think it’s the best thing anybody’s ever seen. And there’s nothing else like it, it’s still not news, you have to have some kind of story that’s not just going to educate people, but it’s going to entertain them. And it has to have some kind of emotion. So we just kind of changed the angle. And when we pitched we didn’t make it about the app, we made it about the personal trainers expertise, we made it about this guy’s story and what he did with his story and his weight loss and how he’s helping other people. And then by default, the app comes into conversation and the app will get promoted. The problem is people are impatient. And they don’t want to wait that long. And they don’t want the little one sentence mentioned, they want the full page mentioned. And it’s just not going to happen. So they get frustrated, and they give up. But if you just do a little bit here and there, it will start to snowball with with that client. Specifically, they got on the Today Show, because a producer for Today’s Show saw their story in the Washington Post, they get into Washington Post, because they did local TV in Washington, DC. They did local TV in Washington, DC, because we pitched a writer there and we came up with different angles at different times to make it newsworthy. So you have to be patient, you have to really just help members of the media and journalists do their job, if you can just give them what they want and what they need on a silver platter and help them do their job. You will get the publicity and you will get the promotion you just have to pump the brakes a little bit because that’s just how the industry works. You

Jeremy Weisz

know, I love the way you backtrack that to the origin, the source right where it started, doesn’t start off. People see it on the Today Show, but they don’t see you got this one writer to write this one paragraph thing and it you know, actually snowballs from there. I’d love for you to talk about because I love your viewpoint on niching. And Today’s Show versus maybe a specific running magazine. So can you talk about that?

Christina Nicholson

Yeah, so these guys they got on the Today Show, which is great. Everybody knows that. It’s amazing for credibility. I mean, you could turn that video clip and you could turn it into an advertisement on Facebook and target runners like it’s huge for credibility and authority. But there’s a lot of people who watch the Today Show who will only run if they are being chased by the killer. So you need to get them in front of their audience. So you do see the profit from the publicity and their number one goal the whole entire time we started working together was Runner’s world, because that is their audience. And we started pitching Runner’s world when we started working together I think it was in October or August, it was in the fall. And magazines work three months ahead of time. So for example, in August, you know, they’re already getting ready to get their December issue out there. So that’s just one thing to keep in mind if you are pitching print magazines. So we were pitching Runner’s world. And after about a month, your pitch should be stale. Because again, remember, you have to be newsworthy if it’s something that can stand on its own year round. It’s not newsworthy. So you have to come up with different pitches at different times. And it took a few months of pitching different people that Runner’s world with different angles. But we did get them in there. It took almost a year. But it happened. And that was their number one audience. And I mean, I guess you could say it took nine months, because again, they’re three months ahead of schedule. But yeah, we got them in Runner’s world. And it’s even though it sounds less impressive than the Today Show. It was their goal, because they were focused on the bigger picture, which were those download numbers and those revenue numbers. A lot of people get really tied up in the pomp and circumstance and the limelight of it all because they want to say, I’ve been here, I’ve been here I’ve been here again, great for credibility. But when it comes down to direct ROI, it may not be as helpful. Does it help? In some ways? Yes. But different media does different things. You know, like online media is great for SEO, because you get all of those backlinks and all those different places, TV is great for credibility. I think podcasts are great for quick ROI, just because the mindset of a podcast listener is so different than somebody who’s scrolling online or flipping through the TV channel. So you just have to keep the different forms of media in mind as well, when you’re pitching.

Jeremy Weisz

You know, I love what you said when you were talking to Ian. Christina. And you said we’d rather look cool or make money, right? The Today Show, you can look cool. And that’s it. There’s a time and a place for that. But Runner’s World is what’s gonna have a make money. It sounds like,

Christina Nicholson

Yeah, and it’s different for everybody. Like, for example, Little Words Project, got them on the Today Show. And for the next week, they were selling hundreds and hundreds of these bracelets. But again, the Today’s Show most people watching that are middle aged women, they’re going to like the bracelets. So what works for you may not work for somebody else.

Jeremy Weisz

Yeah. You know, I want to talk about what’s a good what’s in a good pitch, what was one of the best, I’d love to hear one of the best pitches you received. When you were, you know, in the media, and now when you’re pitching the media, but what was what do you remember one of the best pitches you received?

Christina Nicholson

Yeah, I mean, I can tell you,

Jeremy Weisz

I can get what was in it.

Christina Nicholson

Yeah, I can give you one specific example. But generally, the best ones are five sentences. And they just tell me what the story is why I should care? And are they going to give me everything I need to do it? They’re there. I mean, I got pitches where people would send an idea and I’ll email them back. I’m like, Okay, great. Let’s do it. They’ll say, Okay, well, we’ll be ready next week. And it’s like, no, I came into work at nine this morning, I need to put something on the air at 5pm. Like, we need to go now. And they say, oh, we’re not ready, we need to prepare. Well, now the last opportunity on to the next, you need to keep the pitch short. So the best pitches are definitely short, press releases don’t get open. Even if you put if you put press release in the title like in the subject line, you’re going to get deleted before you’re even opened. Nobody has time for that people in newsrooms, even podcasters. I mean, you know, this Jeremy, like anybody who has any kind of platform, where they give attention to anybody else, they get hundreds, if not 1000s of emails a day, nobody has time to read more than two or three sentences. So you need to grab my attention quickly with the subject line, you need to keep it short, sweet to the point and you need to give me what I need. You know, like, give me talking points, give me video, give me pictures, like help me do my job. Because not only will that increase your chances of coverage, but it will also, it’ll also make it easier for me to work with you now and in the future. And in addition to that, this is something that everybody misses, I think 99% of people miss but if you pitch me and you tell me that you will share it on social media, you will share it with your audience. You just went to the top of my list, because so many people they earned the media exposure and they’re like, Oh, great, I got the exposure. Thanks, bye. That is the you are leaving so much money on the table. When you do that. I can tell you from myself and for clients, that when you share that media exposure on social media, you tagged the media outlet, you tag the journalist, not only does it live longer, but your audience sees that and they see that as you being credible, you being an authority in your space, and that is what turns the publicity industry. Don’t assume everybody saw it, assume nobody saw it. Because even if they did see it two minutes later, they’re gonna forget, because they’re on to the next. So the best pitches, have a short and sweet subject line, a short and sweet email. So I know exactly what I’m getting and what you’re going to give me and you’re going to tell me, you’re going to share it. I’ve had clients who have lost coverage, because they have said, Well, last time we did a story, your client didn’t share it on their social media and their competitor did. So we’re gonna go to their competitor again. And then I will tell you, to give you a specific example of a pitch I got for somebody to be on my podcast Become a Media Maven. And it was a great pitch. This this

Jeremy Weisz

woman, that means a lot coming from you.

Christina Nicholson

Well, I mean, it doesn’t end well. That’s good, though. The pitch was great, because it was like he or she can come on, these are the talking points. And they were very specific. Don’t pitch and say I can talk about entrepreneurship, I can talk about marketing. So can 1000s of other people like what is specific that I’ve never talked about before, that that is going to set you apart? So great talking points, got her on the schedule. And then whoever I don’t know if it was a publicist and booking agency, I don’t know who it was kept emailing after it was scheduled. But before we recorded the interview, to talk about her book is coming out this time. So let’s make sure we say that next email, her book is coming out at this time. So can you release your episode right before this next email and want to make sure her book gets publicity. And we talked and then I cancelled the interview. I was like, Listen, this is not a book promotion podcast, and I canceled the interview. But the thing is, she could have come on. And she could have shared all of her amazing talking points. And she could have said, I go into this more in my book, it’s titled this, it comes out this day. That’s it. And then at the end of the podcast, I would have said, Where can people buy your book? Where can we find out more about you, but because in the pitching process, I was being treated like it was my job and my obligation to promote this strangers book, I just cancelled the thing. So again, with the pitch, stop thinking about yourself, just think of how you can help this person on the other end do their job, and I promise you, the promotion will come naturally. It happens by default.

Jeremy Weisz

Yeah. I mean, if you think about it, Christina, what does any new source podcast want, they want a good story, and they want more audience. So if you give it to them on a silver platter, then that’s exactly what they want. Right. And it’s, it’s, it’s actually funny you say that, because you know about sharing, it seems so simple. But I am kind of baffled by it too, when I have someone on, and I’m like, it’s gonna benefit you, we basically talked about you for 60 minutes, and how cool you are, and in your advice that’s valuable. So I’ve just found myself being really explicit. By the way, when you share it, and you comment on or like it, we make it easy, we post it on LinkedIn, and you all you have to do is share it or, you know, like it, your people, your audience, your followers and friends are gonna see it, just share it. And they’re gonna hear about what you do. It’s,

Christina Nicholson

it’s unbelievable how simple and obvious it is, and people don’t do it. And it’s almost like, people are just using you to get the publicity to your audience. And then they dip out and honest to God, they’re leaving so much money on the table. I wrote for Inc Magazine for two years. And whenever anybody reached out to me, because of an article in ink, it wasn’t directly from the article. It was usually on LinkedIn or Twitter, because I tweeted it, or I shared it. And I said, read this article that I wrote an Inc about this. That’s when people connected to me. And it’s shocking. how lazy and selfish people are when they earn media exposure. I mean, I honestly think that’s what it is. I think people today, they’re impatient. They’re lazy, and they’re selfish. And there’s always a what’s in it for me what’s in it for me. And the funny thing is, is that there’s so much more in it for you if you would share. And we make it so easy for you to share this stuff. But I mean, it’s, it’s it blows it blows my mind. Yeah,

Jeremy Weisz

I think, you know, I think sometimes people are so busy. They don’t even think like Oh, cool. They don’t even think that that’s something they shouldn’t do. And so I found when I say it, the light bulb goes on. Oh, yeah, yeah. Oh, yeah, that makes perfect sense that it’s like they didn’t think of it which, okay, cool. Like that’s there. We’re busy. We’re all busy. So if you are on someone else’s show or you’re on another outlet, share it. You know, they’ll love you for it, but also benefit you because you’re sharing your message. So

Christina Nicholson

I think it’s so rude when people don’t honestly, that’s why I always try to tag people. Sometimes they’re hard to find like, Jeremy, you on Instagram, you were hard to find for me about half hour ago. But I mean, I always try to tag the people say that. So they know like, Look, I’m sharing this, I’m grateful, like, thank you for taking the time for me to share my knowledge with your audience. That’s an amazing opportunity.

Jeremy Weisz

What’s Christina? So you’ve received lots of pitches, what is one of your most proud moments pitches that you sent out? You had all the ducks in a row? And, you know, like, it just all worked exactly how you knew it should work?

Christina Nicholson

Yeah, well, I actually share the pitch with anybody who wants it, you can get it at podcastclout.com/Pat. And this is one of my first pitches that I shared, that I sent. As a new business owner, I was a professional Freelancer at the time and trying to build an online business and you know, doing the whole thing that everybody on the internet tells you is super easy to do. But in real life, it’s not. So I sent a pitch to Pat Flynn. And it wasn’t an email pitch. I mean, yes, I did email. But it was only it was only to two words, or two sentences. And it was I made a video for you. So watch it because you said you never get pitched by video. So here’s a video pitch. And that was because I heard him on a podcast, say he gets 400 emails a day. And granted, this was four years ago. So like, imagine what it is now saying he has 400 emails a day people wanting to be on his podcast, but nobody ever sent them a video. And if somebody sent him a video, he would watch it. So it’s like, okay, here’s a video, watch it. And it was two minutes long. And it was basically like I should be on your podcast. And this is why and this is a this is how I could help your audience. So I sent it a couple of weeks later, I didn’t hear anything. And it was like, on YouTube, I sent him a private link on YouTube. And there was only one view on it. And I knew that was me just making sure it worked. And so I sent a follow up. And it was the follow up where I got booked. And that booking was like a couple months later, I recorded the episode. And then it didn’t come out for a few months later after that. So I kind of walk walk you through the process. And again, that’s at podcastclout.com/Pat, I walk you through the entire process of what happened from start to finish. And from that first episode, not only did I get, you know, customers into my online course, but that led to me being accepted into his his mastermind that he started a couple of years ago. And then after that I was on his podcast a second time, which led to more clients for my agency Media Maven. And I can literally track just being on his I mean that you can see the picture there. He invited me on stage to speak at podcast movement last year. So just that one first pitch that I sent as a professional freelancer, it led to so much. So I think that’s the one I’m probably most proud of because it was one of the first podcast I was on as a guest. It was years before I started my podcast. And it made a big a big difference in my life not only just with, like the revenue that came in but but getting into his mastermind and meeting the other people in his mastermind. I mean, Jeremy, I know you from Jason Swenk, I found out about Jason Swenk from Pat. And if I didn’t pitch him all those years ago, I probably I wouldn’t be here right now with you, you know, like, it’s just the way things happen and how you meet people and learn about people.

Jeremy Weisz

So talk about Podcast Clout.

Christina Nicholson

So Podcast Clout, okay. Let me just be clear. I don’t know anything about software. I don’t know anything about technology. I am not somebody who was like, Oh, let me create software know, how it came about was NPR there are the software’s that exist for you to find, you know anybody in TV and print online. So say you want to pitch Oprah Magazine, you can go into these software’s and you can type in Oprah Magazine, you’ll get all of the information for everybody who works there, every department, their email, their phone number, everything, but nothing like this existed for podcasts. And I learned as you just heard, you can really change your business by being a guest on podcasts. And I was pitching podcasts for myself and for clients. But I was literally picking up my phone and just scrolling through the podcast app, like Oh, this looks good. This looks good. Let me go online and do my research and find out who to pitch and how to pitch them and more information like it was time consuming. So basically, Podcast Clout just automates all of that for you. And we’re very selective because again, this is built from a PR perspective. I don’t want to book my clients on a podcast that nobody listens to, because then they’re going to spend and 30 minutes to an hour talking to somebody, and they’re going to come back to me and be like, Well, that was a waste of time, nobody listens to it. So Podcast Clout does not include the million plus podcasts that are out there. It only includes right now the numbers at about 20,000. And we look at what is ranking at the top of every category and Apple podcasts, they have about 100 categories. You know, you have entrepreneurship, marketing, nonprofit, all kinds of categories, over 100 of them. And we look at the top 200 podcasts in each category every day. And we put all of the information you need to pitch to be a guest in there. Now we don’t pitch for you. We don’t do what you do, Jeremy, where we help people start and grow their own podcast, this was created for people like me, for people in the PR industry who need to pitch their their clients to be guests on podcasts, but they’re tired of spending hours on the admin work. And I just want to build custom pitch list. You can do it based on keyword you can do category, you can put them together to really niche down. And, you know, we see some podcasts, booking agencies use it, some speakers, some authors, people who act as their own publicist and want to get on more podcasts. So that’s that’s how it was created. I started working with business coaches on this because again, I know nothing about software or technology. So I build a team around me of people who know a lot more than me, this was just something that came about, like I saw a big hole in the market and the need for it. And I think, Jeremy, you, I mean, I’d like to hear your thoughts on it. I think people are not understanding or maybe they’re just not educated yet on podcasts because they are newer. And a lot of people just don’t understand the value in them. I mean, we know people spend billions and billions of dollars advertising on podcasts. But I think a lot of people in marketing and in business, they still don’t really don’t really get it. So I think maybe that’s why development on tools like this for podcast specifically have been a little a little slow coming.

Jeremy Weisz

Yeah, exactly. I think, you know, there’s, I see a big need for this. And people should check out Podcastclout. And also I could definitely see some of the the podcast booking agencies out there using it to make it easier. And it serves the podcast community too, because then you’re getting relevant guests on irrelevant shows. And it really helps both parties, because really is a podcast, you’re looking for just relevant guests to what you’re focused in on. And when you get those, like you said, it was nicely crafted pitches. It’s a win for the host, right. It just makes our job easier. And so I’m sure you know, people like Tom Schwab know about your software. If not, Tom, check out Podcast Clout. And but yeah, there’s there’s a big need on both sides that will help. And I’d love to hear first of all, thank you, Christina, for sharing your knowledge. You’ve been on both sides of the pitching being pitched and, you know, crafting good pitches, so that are newsworthy, really. And I want to point people to your website, which we talked about on Podcastclout.com, MediaMavenAndMore.com. Who our ideal clients for you who should be calling you emailing you to work with you.

Christina Nicholson

Yeah, well, I already discussed Podcast Clout. So I’ll go on to Media, Maven, Media, Maven, it’s a it’s a PR agency, we do everything for you. So our retainer starts at 40 $500 a month. And that’s for local niche outreach, and then they go up from there. So again, if you want, you know, like all media outlets, or you want national coverage, you’re gonna pay at least 6500 a month. And that’s pretty average. A lot of people reach out to me and they’re like, Oh, I want PR, but I don’t have that budget. So then I created an online course that’s under 1000 bucks. If you want some help while you execute it, if you want me to build you those media lists, if you want me to look over pitches, if you want to speak with people on my team, then we charge that’s a six month program, it’s very much done with you instead of do it yourself. That’s just under $5,000 over a six month period. And we’ve had a lot of great success I can for people watching live, I can scoot out of the way I have a little note a thank you note from somebody here and she included her her TV hits that she got while she was in that program. And you know we make introductions to the media if we know somebody and if you have a good pitch we’ll introduce you with that though. You have to you have to do the work. You have to set set up your calls with us. You have to pitch the media. We don’t press the buttons for you but we tell you which buttons to press and where you can find the buttons and then you got to go press the buttons yourself. So I offer I mean I have a few different options but I will say it is a time consuming thing pitching the media because you don’t just have to pitch everybody specifically but you have To follow up and then after a couple of weeks, you have to go back to the drawing board with a new angle to make sure it’s newsworthy. So just be mindful of that when you are looking for somebody to help you with PR. Obviously, I have a media background, most of my team has a media background, I do think it makes a big difference when you reach out to people. So make sure you know you’re hiring somebody who has experience and they know what they’re doing. Especially today. I mean, you know, everybody’s everybody’s some kind of expert on the internet. Everybody’s a business coach, a publicist, podcast expert, whatever it is. So just make sure you do your homework. I share a lot of free resources. I have my my podcast as well. So I’m definitely an overshare I don’t hold anything back. So I’m happy to you know, answer any questions for anybody if they are looking to learn a little bit more about the industry.

Jeremy Weisz

And we’re so everyone could check out media maven and more calm we’re all that lives. If you want a course to do you know, do it for yourself. If you want a kind of a done with you or a totally you don’t want to push any of the buttons. You just want her and her team to do it because that’s what they specialize in. Then you can contact them. Christina, thank you so much. Are there any other places online we should point people towards?

Christina Nicholson

Um, you can find me on social I am at Christina all day on Instagram and Twitter. So I’m there every day and I chat back if you chat to me. So thank you, Jeremy.

Jeremy Weisz

Thank you. Thanks, everyone. Check out more episodes and we’ll see you next time.