Dr. Michael Fossel has been working on his dream for 30 years to reverse human aging. Learn about how telomerase therapy can help cure and stop age related diseases like strokes, heart attacks, age related dementia, and much more.

Dr. Fossel has a PhD and MD from Stanford and taught at Stanford and Michigan State medical school.

He is the Author of the medical textbook Cells, Aging, and Human Disease. He wrote Reversing Human Aging and his newest book The Telomerase Revolution: the enzyme that holds the key to human aging..and will soon lead to longer healthier lives.

 

 

 

FUN FACT:

– I asked my wife to marry me after knowing her for 6 days. I met her in a hypnosis laboratory at Stanford.
– Wrestled with a gorilla (bit, been bitten,& kissed her) – watch the end of this video to see
– Bitten by rhesus monkeys twice (and pulled one off the 2nd floor drainpipe)
– Spent time in a Tibetan & Buddhist monasteries
– Taught scuba diving
– Did somersaults in a hang glider and a somersault exiting from a motorcycle
– Still ride a unicycle
– Worked helicopter rescue
– Doctor’s Ski patrol in Colorado
– Home has a rat lab, two secret staircases, and a secret room with 1‑way mirror
– Both parents were ex CIA agents

Business Mentors, Tools, Books:

The DePinho work on rats and the Blasco work on mice. In both cases, they were able to show that they could actually reverse parts of the aging process by using telomerase.

Bill Andrews

Background:

Author of the book on Telomerase Therapy and working to bring telomerase therapy to human trials, Michael Fossel, M.D., Ph.D. was a professor of clinical medicine at Michigan State University for almost 30 years and taught a course on the Biology of Aging as a university professor.

Founder and former editor-in-chief of Rejuvenation Research, he is best known for his views on telomerase therapy as a possible treatment for cellular senescence and human age-related disease. Dr. Fossel has appeared on many major news programs to discuss aging and regularly on National Public Radio (NPR). He is also a respected lecturer, author, and physician.

Prior to earning his M.D. at Stanford Medical School, Fossel earned a joint B.A. (cum laude) and M.A. in psychology at Wesleyan University and a Ph.D. in neurobiology at Stanford University. He is also a graduate of Phillips Exeter Academy. After graduating from medical school in 1981, he was awarded a National Science Foundation fellowship and taught at Stanford University Medical School.

Dr. Fossel has lectured at the National Institute for Health, the Smithsonian Institution, and at various other universities and institutes around the world. Dr. Fossel is a fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians, a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Gerontological Society of America, the American Society on Aging, and the American Geriatrics Society, and served on the board of directors for the American Aging Association, as well as their executive director.

Dr. Fossel has written numerous articles on aging and ethics for the Journal of the American Medical Association and In Vivo, and he published a book titled Reversing Human Aging in 1996. The book garnered favorable reviews from mainstream newspapers as well as Scientific American and has since been published in six languages. His magisterial academic textbook Cells, Aging, and Human Disease was published in 2004 by Oxford University Press. His latest book, Electronic Health Records: Strategies for Long-Term Success was published in 2013 by Health Administration Press. His new book, tentatively titled Telomerase Therapy, is now in press and due for publication in 2015.

Since his days teaching at Stanford University, Fossel has studied aging from a medical and scientific perspective with a particular emphasis on premature aging syndromes such as progeria, and since at least 1996 he has been a strong and vocal advocate of experimenting with telomerase therapy as a way of treating diseases, disorders, and syndromes such as progeria, Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, osteoporosis, cancer, AIDS, and organ senescence (i.e., aging). However, he is careful to qualify his advocacy of telomerase therapy as being a potential treatment for these conditions rather than a “cure for old age” and a panacea for age-related medical conditions, albeit a potential treatment that could radically extend the maximum human life span and reverse the aging process in most people. Specifically, Fossel sees the potential of telomerase therapy as being a highly effective point of intervention in a wide variety of medical conditions.

Check out:
MichaelFossel.com

The Telomerase Revolution: The Enzyme That Holds the Key to Human Aging…and Will Soon Lead to Longer, Healthier Lives

Special Thank you to Kidd Russell for the Intro music contribution and here is full music video.

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